Warning: Craft Content

Oh my gosh, I have fallen in love with a new crochet stitch that I am learning.  The Crocodile Stitch.  It looks much more difficult than it really is.  Once I got the hang of it, I couldn’t stop!  I am currently making scarves for the Winter Clothing Drive, and I will probably have a few that are made of this stitch.  I am currently working on one such scarf with a glossy yarn.  I don’t usually work with glossy yarns because they slip around so much that it can be difficult to get the yarn where you need.  It seems to be working out alright so far.

Crocodile Stitch Scarf

Crocodile Stitch Scarf

Did I say how much I love this stitch? Squeee!  I feel like a yarn-o-holic fan girl.  At any rate, I think I will do another scarf like this one but in a green or blue, to enhance the “scales” feeling.  Maybe a green with some pink/purple to give it a leaf and flower petal feel?  I am thinking up of more projects faster than I can crochet them.  Alas, there’s more.

Another stitch that I learned is the Smooth Wave Stitch.  It is also for crochet and comes together seamlessly and quickly.  I still need to work on carrying that second color of yarn over.  My job looks a little heavier and thicker along one side because of this.  However, it’s not so noticeable that I feel uncomfortable giving it away.  I used a softer multi-purple yarn with a worsted weight grey.  The textures balance out to an overall soft feel.  I wasn’t sure how these two colors were going to work together, but I love it!

Smooth Wave Scarf

Smooth Wave Scarf

Finished Smooth Wave Scarf

Finished Smooth Wave Scarf

I had to fold it on itself a couple of times to get the whole thing to fit into the picture.  This one turned out pretty long and just the right width.  I think it will make some teenager or young adult very happy 🙂  I know I fell in love with it and am finding it difficult to part with. Of course, this can be said for just about any of the scarves I am making.  And I’m not just crocheting; I’ve made a few knitted scarves as well.

The first one I did didn’t turn out quite right so I ripped three quarters of a finished scarf out. That’s right, I’m that picky (insert: crazy, OCD, unnecessarily persnickety).  If I were wearing the scarf, I would want it to be just the right height and width, so I felt justified in ruining my creation.  I started over and did a basic garter stitch with a super chunky purple yarn.  I have about 6 skeins of this yarn (no idea why, there must have been a sale.. but why did I only get purple?), so I’m going to be making quite a few scarves with this.

Purple Chunky Scarf - Knitted

Purple Chunky Scarf – Knitted

Sorry about the brightness of the picture, I don’t know how to turn the bamfangled flash off on the digi cam.  C’est la vie, I have more!

Ribbed Purple Scarf

Ribbed Purple Scarf

These yarns are the exact same color, the one on top just got bleached out by the flash.  I love this color and the yarn is super soft which makes it great for scarves and hats.  OOooh! Hats.  Maybe I should make a couple of hats to go with them.  As you can see, the Ribbed (knit 2, purl 2, knit2, etc.) scarf is smaller in length and width.  This one is made for a younger child so it’s much stretchier due to the ribbing. This is great for a kids scarf which will take a lot more damage. It’s not made for a toddler but someone 6 or older.  I did make a scarf for a toddler, though, and also fell in love with it.

Super Fuzzy Toddler Scarf

Super Fuzzy Toddler Scarf

This scarf is about four to five inches wide and three feet long.  I have found that a good length for a scarf is either as long as the person is tall or as long as the person’s arm span from one fingertip to the opposite one.  These are usually pretty similar, so one or the other will work.  I find making them from the arm span length a little easier as I can hold out the scarf as I’m still working on it and compare the other person’s arm span to my own.  The thing I love about this scarf is that it is made with two separate and completely different types of yarn.  I used an ultra white worsted weight yarn and wrapped a super soft eyelash yarn around it.  I plan on getting some green, blue, and purple eyelash yarns to make more scarves like this one but in more colors.  I must say that I loved this scarf for its stretchiness, color, and super soft fluffiness.  I am tempted to make a quasi-necklace scarf for myself using this same technique. Maybe in a year or two when I’ve actually completed all of my current projects!

Well, that’s all for now. I have four scarves completed and the crocodile stitch scarf will probably be done mid-week.  After that, I should probably think of making some hats to go with the scarfs.  Maybe I can do sets? Sweet! I hope all the kiddos at the church clothing drive love these as much as I do 🙂

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2 thoughts on “Warning: Craft Content

  1. Ooh, new stitches to try! Never seen crocodile stitch or smooth wave stitch so I’ll definitely being trying both those in the future, maybe as scarves too as yours look so great.

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    • The smooth wave stitch makes a superb scarf! I started using it to make a scarf that would match my winter coat using a lovely sparkling yarn, but it’s not my winter coat anymore. Oh well.
      The crocodile (or scale) stitch is so beautiful and fun to make. A few tips, though: it is heavy! It takes up to about three times as much yarn and it reverses if you fold over the scarf. If making a tote bag out of it, I would definitely make two separate pieces with it and then join them together so that the scales go the same way. With my scale stitch scarf, when I wrap it around my neck, the scales change direction on one side. I wish I’d known sooner X___X

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